Derby News

2017 Big O Results

2017 Big O Results Photo credit: Benma Photo. facebook.com/benmaphoto

The Big O Tournament has been a platform for WFTDA, MRDA, and Junior roller derby teams to hit the track since 2011. In 2017 there are 16 WFTDA teams, 9 MRDA, and 4 junior teams in Eugene, Oregon from four different continents.

Check out our WFTDA preview of the weekend, Muckety Muck’s MRDA overview, and Sean Hale’s tournament tips for fans. Below are the results from the weekend with each team’s current ranking. Green are WFTDA sanctioned games, purple are WFTDA B teams, blue is MRDA games, and yellow are the junior games. Each game is linked with its archived video.

2017 Roller Derby Springs Forward

2017 Roller Derby Springs Forward Photo credit: Danny Ngan Photography. facebook.com/dannynganphotography/

So far in 2017, we have had two mostly quiet months of  Roller Derby, on the track anyways, online we’ve been saturated with announcements. To name a few, we have learned the tournament locations for both the Women’s Flat Track Derby Association and the Men’s Roller Derby Association, which both include locations in Europe for the first time. WFTDA introduced a new tournament structure and the women and men’s organizations are now partnering with the Junior Roller Derby Association on the rules of Flat Track Roller Derby.

WFTDA has released two months of rankings, but so far little has changed overall, and none of the top 16 teams have budged. A few events and games have already taken place around the globe, and we’ll take a minute to look at some important remaining March events. Check out our calendar page for events throughout the year, and let us know if there’s anything we should add.

WFTDA 2017 Rules Update: Major Gameplay Changes

WFTDA 2017 Rules Update: Major Gameplay Changes Photo credit: Olivier Vax Photo. www.oliviervax.com

The Women’s Flat Track Derby Association released their updated rules in December, and leagues have been able to use them since then, but the new rules won’t be optional any longer starting February 15th.

Last time we talked about the major overall format changes to the rules, and in case you still haven’t really looked them over yet, we picked through the specific changes to gameplay, and located where to find them in the new Rulebook and Casebook.

2017 European Roller Derby Organizational Conference (EROC)

2017 European Roller Derby Organizational Conference (EROC) Photo credit: Michael Wittig. facebook.com/Michael.Wittig.Berlin

Roller Derby as we know it now has been strongly rooted in the United States since the early 2000s, with many leagues hitting their 10-year mark the last few years. The Women’s Flat Track Derby Association has been a means to support and connect leagues, but being based in the U.S. it can only reach so far. WFTDA tournaments have always been held in the North America, eight of the top ten teams are from the U.S., and all of WFTDA leadership is located in the States which often gives the rest of the world a feeling of disconnect.

Roller Derby has spread around the globe now, but at a rate that hasn’t been able to fully support itself. After derby hit Europe in 2006, one of the ways the continent has sought to connect different nations and foster the growth of the sport has been the European Roller Derby Organizational Conference. Bear City will be hosting the 8th annual EROC next month.

WFTDA 2017 Rules Update: Major Format Changes

WFTDA 2017 Rules Update: Major Format Changes Photo credit: Deadwards

The Women’s Flat Track Derby Association released the new rules at the beginning of the month, and we took a quick look at them last week and talked in general about the updated look and changes to the format. Now we are going to delve a little deeper to break down the organization of the Rulebook and the Casebook and how WFTDA went from 74 pages of rules to a much more condensed version.

Here, we will look at the rules as a whole and break them down for those who are familiar with the old format as well as those taking on derby for the first time and have no clue what they’re looking at.

We recommend spending some time with the rules, even if you had the old set memorized, and then follow up by reading them again alongside the Casebook. It sets up scenarios that teams could easily play out at practice, and catch even the derby veteran up to speed on the intricacies of things such as scoring or star passes – always a good thing.