Deadwards

2016 WFTDA Rankings Review

2016 WFTDA Rankings Review Photo credit: Danforth Johnson.

2016 was another exciting year in WFTDA roller derby. It had rising stars, tough matchups, and a strong challenge at the top to take home the Hydra. Gotham tried to prove that a small hiccup in their record was nothing to worry about, but Rose City followed through with a repeat Championships victory in front of their home crowd.

Division 2 did not disappoint either with numerous underdogs keeping any of the top three seeded teams from making it out of their respective D2 playoffs alive. Blue Ridge came back from the outer realm to be the first D2 team to make it all the way to Championships for the second time and Calgary pushed hard in their first year qualifying for WFTDA tournaments.

With WFTDAs’ recent 2017 Playoff announcements, this year only the top 52 leagues will qualify for postseason tournaments, so the competition will be even tighter to make it to the top. Here’s a roundup of rankings highlights from last year, and possible teams to look out for in 2017.

WFTDA 2017 Rules Update: Major Gameplay Changes

WFTDA 2017 Rules Update: Major Gameplay Changes Photo credit: Olivier Vax Photo. www.oliviervax.com

The Women’s Flat Track Derby Association released their updated rules in December, and leagues have been able to use them since then, but the new rules won’t be optional any longer starting February 15th.

Last time we talked about the major overall format changes to the rules, and in case you still haven’t really looked them over yet, we picked through the specific changes to gameplay, and located where to find them in the new Rulebook and Casebook.

2016 Concluded

2016 Concluded Photo credit: Deadwards

If you haven’t been over to our Facebook page, we’ve uploaded submissions from numerous photographers for three different categories depicting 2016. We received some great shots from photographers we hadn’t seen before and from places all over the world! Below we have put all three albums in one place and then listed each of the photographers who submitted and where you can find their work.

2017 European Roller Derby Organizational Conference (EROC)

2017 European Roller Derby Organizational Conference (EROC) Photo credit: Michael Wittig. facebook.com/Michael.Wittig.Berlin

Roller Derby as we know it now has been strongly rooted in the United States since the early 2000s, with many leagues hitting their 10-year mark the last few years. The Women’s Flat Track Derby Association has been a means to support and connect leagues, but being based in the U.S. it can only reach so far. WFTDA tournaments have always been held in the North America, eight of the top ten teams are from the U.S., and all of WFTDA leadership is located in the States which often gives the rest of the world a feeling of disconnect.

Roller Derby has spread around the globe now, but at a rate that hasn’t been able to fully support itself. After derby hit Europe in 2006, one of the ways the continent has sought to connect different nations and foster the growth of the sport has been the European Roller Derby Organizational Conference. Bear City will be hosting the 8th annual EROC next month.

WFTDA 2017 Rules Update: Major Format Changes

WFTDA 2017 Rules Update: Major Format Changes Photo credit: Deadwards

The Women’s Flat Track Derby Association released the new rules at the beginning of the month, and we took a quick look at them last week and talked in general about the updated look and changes to the format. Now we are going to delve a little deeper to break down the organization of the Rulebook and the Casebook and how WFTDA went from 74 pages of rules to a much more condensed version.

Here, we will look at the rules as a whole and break them down for those who are familiar with the old format as well as those taking on derby for the first time and have no clue what they’re looking at.

We recommend spending some time with the rules, even if you had the old set memorized, and then follow up by reading them again alongside the Casebook. It sets up scenarios that teams could easily play out at practice, and catch even the derby veteran up to speed on the intricacies of things such as scoring or star passes – always a good thing.